1. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) - https://www.aiaa.org

1.1. Guide to Lithium Battery Safety for Space Applications (AIAA G-136-2022)

This document contains requirements and guidelines related to the safety of lithium-ion batteries used in space systems including but not limited to satellites, launch vehicles, interplanetary probes, rovers and landers.

https://webstore.ansi.org/standards/aiaa/aiaa1362022

1.2. Electrical Power Systems for Unmanned Spacecraft (AIAA S-122-2007)

This document, when followed in its entirety, will yield a robust electrical power system (EPS) design suitable for very high-reliability space missions. This document specifies general design practices and sets minimum verification and validation requirements for power systems of unmanned spacecraft. The focus of the document is on earth orbiting satellites using traditional photovoltaic/battery power, but does not exclude other primary power generation and storage methods. This document does not address specific launch vehicle requirements however much of the design philosophy used here is applicable to launch vehicle power systems.

https://doi.org/10.2514/4.479144.001

1.3. Qualification and Quality Requirements for Electrical Components on Space Solar Panels (AIAA S-112A-2013)

This document establishes qualification and quality requirements for the electrical components integrated onto spacecraft solar panels that carry single crystal silicon solar cells or gallium arsenide solar cells having any number of junctions including those with metamorphic and inverted metamorphic structure. In this standard the term panel defines the assembly of electrical components to be tested. The standard also defines requirements for solar panel manufacturers' quality systems and for qualification and characterization of the electrical components on solar panels.

https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/10.2514/4.102455.001

1.4. Qualification and Quality Requirements for Space Solar Cells (AIAA S-111A-2014)

This document establishes qualification and quality requirements for crystalline silicon and gallium arsenide-based single and multiple junction solar cell types for space applications. This includes requirements for solar cell manufacturer quality systems and for characterization of solar cells. Requirements for acceptance testing of lots are not defined in the current version of this document.

https://doi.org/10.2514/4.102806.001

1.5. Qualification and Quality Requirements for Electrical Components on Space Solar Panels – Amendment 1 (AIAA S-112A-2013/A1-2019)

This amendment to AIAA S-112A-2013 is intended to change requirements to the effect of reducing the current in solar cell circuits tested in darkness.

https://doi.org/10.2514/4.105869.001

2. International Organization for Standardization (ISO) - https://www.iso.org

2.1. Lithium ion battery for space vehicles (ISO 17546:2016)

Specifies design and minimum verification requirements for lithium ion rechargeable (including lithium ion polymer) batteries for space vehicles. Lithium ion secondary electrochemical systems use intercalation compounds (intercalated lithium exists in an ionic or quasi-atomic form within the lattice of the electrode material) in the positive and in the negative electrodes. The focus of this International Standard is on "battery assembly" and cell is described as "component cells" to be harmonized with other industrial standards and regulations. "Performance"," safety", and "logistics" are the main points of view to specify. ISO 17546:2016 does not address "disposal" or "recycle"; however, some recommendations regarding disposal are suggested.

Notes:

  • Published but under revision, no date given

https://www.iso.org/standard/60028.html

3.  American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International - https://www.astm.org/

3.1. New Practice for Safe Operating Practices In-Space for Space Fission Reactors Used for Nuclear Power and Propulsion (ASTM WK86387)

The general scope is defined as in-space (surface and off-surface) use of space reactors. In order to be successful, a standards development effort would need to be appropriately scoped such that there is a meaningful span of effort, but not one so broad to be watered down or to infringe upon other development efforts. To that end, it is proposed that the standards development activity have the following guiderails:

  • Design-agnostic (i.e., not favoring any particular nuclear fuel, moderator, heat rejection system, etc.);
  • Use-agnostic (i.e., not confined to use in spacecraft, on landers, on rovers, etc.);
  • Sponsor-agnostic (i.e., not confined to a government-sponsored, purely commercial, or hybrid mission);
  • In-space aspects only (i.e., operation in-space, and specifically not ground testing or on-Earth operation);
  • All modes of operation (i.e., startup, low-to-full power, shutdown, restart, etc.);
  • All normal and accident conditions (e.g., normal operation, transients and anticipated operational occurrences, design/licensing basis accidents, beyond-design/licensing basis accidents);
  • Safety and safety/security interface (but not solely security issues);
  • Design and build only as it directly affects operation (i.e., not methods for demonstrating the safety basis, not addressing terrestrial licensing issues, etc.);
  • Objectives and processes (i.e., not prescribing specific engineered safety features but describing the objectives and safety functions of engineered safety features and how their safety benefit can be traded against other mission demands);
  • Limited human-rating considerations (e.g., not focused on crew safety and proximity operations aspects in general while still addressing access in the context of reactor servicing, etc.); and
  • Limited planetary protection considerations (e.g., consideration of harmful contamination aspects related to the Outer Space Treaty insofar as they are affected by design but leaving forward planetary protection hardware standards to other and existing guidance).

Notes:

  • Under development

https://www.astm.org/workitem-wk86387

4.  NASA - https://www.nasa.gov/

4.1. Advanced Modular Power Systems (AMPS) Modular Electronics Standard for Space Power Systems (MESSPS)

The AMPS technology portfolio includes the development of modular power units which, when combined with standardized interfaces, will provide commonality across a variety of exploration vehicles for future NASA missions. The project has developed the Modular Electronic Standard for Space Power Systems, which defines the form, fit, and function of each modular power unit for human exploration missions and systems. 

https://techport.nasa.gov/view/10759

Current spacecraft power systems are typically custom designed for each mission, each with their own set of unique components. As humans move toward long duration exploration missions further from Earth, often involving multiple vehicles, the repeated development of specialized power converters, power regulators, and switchgear is costly. Additionally, providing an inventory of spare components for each unique system is logistically impractical. The goal of this standard is to identify a set of universal modular power components that provide power system commonality and interoperability across a variety of applications. Modularity enhances reusability, as components can be interchanged between multiple vehicles and missions, or re-purposed from retired platforms. It also allows for flexibility in the power system architecture and decreases system downtime, as components can be easily replaced.

https://techport.nasa.gov/view/10759?lib=169184


4.2. AMPS CANopen Profile for Modular Power Electronics

The AMPS technology portfolio includes the development of modular power units which, when combined with standardized interfaces, will provide commonality across a variety of exploration vehicles for future NASA missions. The project has developed the Modular Electronic Standard for Space Power Systems, which defines the form, fit, and function of each modular power unit for human exploration missions and systems. 

https://techport.nasa.gov/view/10759

This device profile specifies the CANopen interface general definitions for all modules defined in GRC-AES-AMPS-DOC-006 (Modular Standard for Space Power Systems).

https://techport.nasa.gov/view/10759?lib=169186

5.  SAE International (formerly Society of Automotive Engineers) - https://www.sae.org

5.1. Space Power Standard (AS5698A)

This standard defines the requirements and characteristics of electrical power for spacecraft. This standard also defines analysis, verification, and testing methodologies to be used to ensure that the loads operate when connected to the specified power quality and performance as defined by this standard.

https://www.sae.org/standards/content/as5698a/

5.2. SAE Electric Vehicle (EV) and Plug in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) Conductive Charge Coupler (J1772 _201710)

This SAE Standard covers the general physical, electrical, functional and performance requirements to facilitate conductive charging of EV/PHEV vehicles in North America. This document defines a common EV/PHEV and supply equipment vehicle conductive charging method including operational requirements and the functional and dimensional requirements for the vehicle inlet and mating connector.

https://www.sae.org/standards/content/j1772_201710/

6. International Deep Space Interoperability Standards - https://www.internationaldeepspacestandards.com/

6.1. International Space Power System Interoperability Standards (ISPSIS)

The purpose of this electrical power standard is to define bus voltages, and the associated power quality and single point grounding for individual or integrated 120 VDC and 28 VDC spacecraft power systems. These definitions will facilitate commonality, reliability, safety, interchangeability, and interoperability of load applications between space power systems such as orbital habitats, crewed or non- crewed space vehicles, ascent/descent vehicles, and surface systems. A commonality in basic equipment (lights, fans, computers, modular electrical switchgear, etc.) reduces the need for unique spares that reduce the overall spare mass allocation and required stowage volume. This has a tangible impact on module size and the ultimate mass of the launch vehicle payload.

Because this is a standard and not a specification, physical interfaces between loads and power systems are not defined.

This standard defines the requirements and characteristics of electrical power for spacecraft. These requirements and characteristics are intended to be met over the entire life of the vehicle. This standard also defines analysis, verification, and testing methodologies to be used to ensure that the loads operate when connected to the specified power quality and performance as defined by this standard, Utilizing this power standard, a power quality specification can then be developed that includes the detailed design performance of both the Electrical Power System (EPS) and the Electrical Power Consuming Equipment (EPCE).

https://internationaldeepspacestandards.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/ISPSIS-RevA-20220727-2.pdf

Notes:

  • Also covers engineering topics

6.2. International Thermal System Interoperability Standards (ITSIS)

All spacecraft require a thermal management system to maintain a tolerable thermal environment for the spacecraft crew and/or equipment. The purpose of this document is to state standards for when common fluids are employed in active external and internal coolant loops and agreed-to requirements for coldplates that interface directly to those coolant loops. Future revisions of the document will incorporate any additional content for deep space missions that is not already included. This standard supports reliability and commonality for cooling systems that work across elements, when there is agreement to utilize common coolant(s). This document also provides basic, common design parameters to allow developers to independently develop and/or provide compatible coldplates.

https://internationaldeepspacestandards.com/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/thermal_baseline_final_8-2019.pdf

7. International Electrotechnical Commission - https://www.iec.ch/publications/international-standards

7.1. IEC standard voltages (IEC 60038:2009+AMD1:2021 CSV)

EC 60038:2009+A1:2021 specifies standard voltage values which are intended to serve as preferential values for the nominal voltage of electrical supply systems, and as reference values for equipment and system design. This release constitutes a technical revision. The significant technical changes are:

  • the addition of the values of 230 V (50 Hz) and 230/400 V (60 Hz) to Table 1;
  • the replacement of the utilization voltage range at LV by a reference to the relevant standard and an informative annex;
  • the addition of the value of 30 kV to Table 3;
  • the replacement of the value of 1 050 kV by 1 100 kV in Table 5.

It has the status of a horizontal standard in accordance with IEC Guide 108.

https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/72877

8. US Department of Defense

8.1. MIL-STD-3071 Tactical Microgrid Communications and Control

This standard establishes criteria to enable the interoperability of hardware and software necessary to operate a tactical microgrid on the battlefield with respect to the design, intelligent control, stability and performance, security, safety of personnel, and the protection of the tactical microgrid system and equipment.

This standard defines the tactical microgrid architecture using open standards to support a modular, highly cohesive system structure in order to leverage the collaborative innovation of industry, academia, and government participants along with stakeholders.

https://quicksearch.dla.mil/ImageRedirector.aspx?token=5781064.285095

9. Wireless Power Consortium (https://www.wirelesspowerconsortium.com/)

9.1. Qi Wireless Power Transfer System

The Qi wireless power transfer system uses magnetic induction to transfer power from a Power Transmitter Product (charger) to a Power Receiver Product (smartphone). Within these products are Power Transmitter (PTx) and Power Receiver (PRx) subsystems, which contain coils as well as circuitry that handles the communication and power transfer between them. The basic physical principle that governs the functionality defined in the Qi wireless power transfer specification is magnetic induction: the phenomenon that a time-varying magnetic field generates an electromotive force in a suitably positioned inductor. In a Qi wireless power transfer system, this electromotive force produces a voltage across the terminals of a coil-shaped inductor, and is used to drive the electronics of an appropriate load to which it is connected. Conventional transformers use the same effect to achieve inductive power transfer between a primary and a secondary coil that are strongly coupled by means of a magnetic core.

https://www.wirelesspowerconsortium.com/knowledge-base/specifications/download-the-qi-specifications/


10. IEEE (https://standards.ieee.org)

10.1. IEEE 1547-2018

IEEE Standard for Interconnection and Interoperability of Distributed Energy Resources with Associated Electric Power Systems Interfaces

https://standards.ieee.org/ieee/1547/5915/




Comments:

This is on page 11 of the Slido download, "SAE International Electrical Power Systems (Uncrewed vehicles)." But Google doesn't offer any useful pointers. Does anyone know anything about this?

Posted by morsekl1 at Feb 05, 2024 17:34